PERFORMANCE

 

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THE EVANESCED: EMBODIED DISAPPEARNCE 2017 

The Evanesced is an exhibition at CAAM featuring a suite of 100 drawings, 7 paintings and a performance by Kenyatta A.C Hinkle was on view from March 2nd-June 25, 2017 curated by Deputy Director, Naima J. Keith. On April 27, 2017 Kenyatta A.C. Hinkle debuted an in gallery performance of The Evanesced: Embodied Disappearance, in which she evoked various types of women navigating historical and contemporary contexts. The piece—which includes a soundtrack of whispers, shuffles, and snippets of popular and underground music—adds another dimension to an emotional examination of erasure and violence, a fraught part of the

black female experience.


The Evanesced is an exhibition at CAAM featuring a suite of 100 drawings, 7 paintings and a performance by Kenyatta A.C Hinkle was on view from March 2nd-June 25, 2017 curated by Deputy Director, Naima J. Keith. On April 27, 2017 Kenyatta A.C. Hinkle debuted an in gallery performance of The Evanesced: Embodied Disappearance, in which she evoked various types of women navigating historical and contemporary contexts. The piece—which includes a soundtrack of whispers, shuffles, and snippets of popular and underground music—adds another dimension to an emotional examination of erasure and violence, a fraught part of the Black female experience.

Exploring The Nowannago: Kentifrican Modes of Resistance 2016-

“Navigating the Historical Present” is a mantra for Kenyatta A.C. Hinkle’s practice in which she creates performative situations to illustrate how she grapples with the residue of history related to the context of exploring the exotification and exploitation of the Black female body. The performance Exploring The Nowannago involves a Kentifrican narrative that provides a social critique of how we are chained to the residue of the past and how bodies that are deemed the Other through labels of queerness, racial constructions and gender constructions are treated. Performance features Kenyatta A.C. Hinkle and Tyler MattheExploring The Nowannago: Kentifrican Modes of Resistance features Kenyatta A.C. Hinkle and Tyler Matthew Oyer and the music of The Kevin Robinson Ensemble (KREation). This performative body of work involves a Kentifrican narrative that provides a social critique of how we are chained to the residue of the past and how bodies that are deemed the “other” through labels of queerness, racial constructions and gender constructions are treated.w Oyer with a musical score by The Kevin Robinson Ensemble (KREation).

 
The Cross Examination 9:30

The Cross-Examination 2014 -

 

The Cross Examination is an endurance performance piece that Hinkle revisited from 2010 in which she created a piece called "How Long Can I Keep My Mouth Wide Open Like A Beast?" After the deaths of Trayvon Martin and shortly before the death of Micheal Brown Hinkle was compelled to revisit this endurance performance in 2014 in which it speaks to the Black Lives Matter Movement. Hinkle's performance is a silent/scream/protest about the policing of the black body historically and in within our present time. Hinkle also conjures up the haunting and inhumane examination of slaves on auction blocks who were forced to open their mouths so that potential buyers could examine their health.

Run time 10:32
2014

The Countermand challenges notions of the exotic in which HInkle took all of the items from her wardrobe that has labeled her as exotic by others on various occasions and put them on all at once. She found that when certain pieces were worn individually the clothing became a catalyst for a forced association and assumption of her being authentically African when read with her skin and features. These assumptions made her question clothing and attire as performative gestures of camouflage, concealing and posturing. She documented herself putting all of the clothes and sandwich footage of her taking them off until she began to disappear and reappear while simultaneously appearing to be from some unnamed tribe, geography and mythology.The Countermand challenges notions of the exotic in which HInkle took all of the items from her wardrobe that has labeled her as exotic by others on various occasions and put them on all at once. She found that when certain pieces were worn individually the clothing became a catalyst for a forced association and assumption of her being authentically African when read with her skin and features. These assumptions made her question clothing and attire as performative gestures of camouflage, concealing and posturing. She documented herself putting all of the clothes and sandwich footage of her taking them off until she began to disappear and reappear while simultaneously appearing to be from some unnamed tribe, geography and mythology.

The Countermand-Short version 2014